How To Integrate The Different Learning Styles In A Classroom Applying Learning Styles, Training Teaching and Education

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Applying Learning Styles, Training Teaching and Education

Reece, Walker (2003) Abraham Maslow’s (1962) Hierarchy of Basic Human Needs is well known and is based on ensuring that lower needs are met before moving forward in a step-by-step progression from basic physical needs to self-actualization.

Malsow’s theories described a life cycle of needs from the lowest need to self-actualization. These needs can be applied to motivation in a learning environment by encouraging students to learn and making them feel comfortable. Once students settle into classroom work, a well-designed course will naturally move up the pyramid until the last day when they can feel self-accomplished after completing final assessments. Those students who do not absorb information as well as others may find themselves at a lower level within Maslow’s pyramid as the course progresses.

Apply the 3 learning theories; Psychomotor, affective and cognitive areas when identifying appropriate methods and means:

Psychomotor mastery is skill-based. The student will make a product. The three levels of hands-on instruction include imitation, practice, and habit. The psychomotor domain is permeated with a demonstration, delivery and the first level, imitation, will simply be a return of the demonstration under the watchful eye of the instructor. The practice level will be a skills development experience that can be carried out by the student without the direct supervision of the teacher. The habit level is reached when the learner can perform the skill in twice the time it takes the instructor or an expert to perform it. Delivery is demonstration and development of skills in nature. The assessment will be a performance or skill test. The content that needs to be known to do the skill is cognitive and should be treated accordingly.

Learning domains help identify appropriate learning strategies for each subject. Most soldiers are in the psychomotor domain, so they learn best with a hands-on approach. Those within the cognitive domain are also taken into account during the lesson planning process, for example: I give a full explanation that encourages students to think and reflect on the subject being taught. I also consider those in other domains delivering information interactively with a methodology of explanation, demonstration, imitation and practice.

In my experience, soldiers learn best when active and participatory classes are taught: “I hear and forget; I see and remember; I do and understand.”

The methods used to deliver training include lectures, tutorials and discussions or a combination of these. There are many different factors that can influence the selection of technique to impart knowledge and motivate students. Mental, physical skills, attitudes and instructional methods are systematically selected.

This process ensures that knowledge is imparted to students in a way that they can cope with, that is, that the level of teaching is adjusted to the individual and that the information should not be at a level that they cannot understand, nor should it be at a level that allow to sponsor students. During the planning stages answer the following questions: ‘What is your literacy level?’ and ‘What is the most appropriate teaching method?’ The answers help to assess the level at which the lessons are developed. Group interaction is often used during delivery as it facilitates memory retention.

Good communication is essential in any discussion because of the amount of information that is absorbed, I interact whenever the group conversation goes “off” or when the conversations seem to fade, that is, I prepare for those eventualities by presenting other issues related to the conversation. that rejuvenates the activity.

Research activities followed by discussion are a good method of self-learning as each student is encouraged to research certain topics and arrive at an answer or solution. In addition to being a beneficial method of delivery, it also promotes motivation as students defend their point of view. Students are monitored throughout the discussion to ensure that each person participates, which in turn promotes equality, diversity and helps build student confidence. The techniques and processes described above allow for good control of the group and facilitate management control while promoting learning in an interactive teacher environment.

Each subject is broken down into “bite-sized” chunks to formulate a mapping process to ensure lessons are delivered in the right way at the right time and presented at the right level for progressive education. Before moving on to the next phase of a subject, they are encouraged to reflect on the previous activity before putting the theoretical knowledge into practical skills, that is, they are given time to absorb the information personally before reflecting on what was taught. finally performing the physical skill, not unlike Kolb’s learning cycle.

This suggests that there are four stages that follow one another: The concrete experience is followed by a reflection on that experience at a personal level. This can be followed by the derivation of general rules that describe the experience, or the application of known theories to it (abstract conceptualization) and thus the construction of ways to modify the next occurrence of the experience (active experimentation), leading to passing to the following concrete experience. All this can happen in a flash, or over days, weeks or months, depending on the subject, and there can be a “wheels within wheels” process at the same time.

The design and teaching of training taking into account relevant theories ensures that students feel safe and relaxed in the classroom and fosters a structured and safe learning environment. Interactive teaching methods encourage a positive attitude within the student; it also sponsors a positive and logical learning experience.

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