How To Cook St Louis Style Ribs In Crock Pot More Tips and Techniques About Your New Instant Pot Pressure Cooker

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More Tips and Techniques About Your New Instant Pot Pressure Cooker

How do you like your eggs?

Cooking eggs in the Instant Pot®, like rice, is a favorite. An Internet search reveals many tips, tricks, and advice about cooking eggs. Again, most of them are wrong. This is an area that you, as a user of this particular tool will have to explore for yourself.

The most popular method seems to be the “5-5-5” method. To wit: “Put 6 eggs in a basket or on a trivet, “Pressure Cook” for 5 minutes, then wait 5 minutes, and then cool for 5 minutes in an ice bath.

However, I find that “8-8-8” works better for me. I started with the eggs straight from the fridge, and then went to cook them, “8 minutes of “Pressure Cook”, 8 minutes of waiting, 8 minutes in the ice bath”.

What I haven’t had much luck with is the “Steam” approach to cooking eggs. In this method, the “Steam” function is used by the “Pressure Cook” method. Even at the site of 12 minutes “Steam”, 12 minutes waiting, and 12 minutes in the ice bath did not release what I would call a hard-cooked, uniformly yellow yolk egg that is easy to peel.

But that’s just what I like. Plan to use at least one box of eggs, find out what you like and how your new device works.

How much can I cook at one time?

In general, you should not fill the Instant Pot® above the “MAX” line embossed on the liner. However, aside from this limitation, there is no hard and fast rule about how much you can cook at one time.

There are techniques that allow you to layer things like ribs, chicken, ears of corn, etc.

To add a layer, make sure you place a square of aluminum foil between the layers. This prevents the food in the layers from connecting, or creating “funny” looking cooking patterns.

My cooker, the IP-DUO60v3, can only hold three large packages of corn in one layer of the trivet. Similarly, I only have four chicken drumsticks in one set. Hover, I have cooked 9 whole corns at once by using an aluminum foil to separate the layers and turn the ears of corn between the layers.

Similarly, I made 12 drums at a time by making three layers, each separated by a square of foil.

What’s best is that you don’t need to add more than 1 cup of water: the cooking is done by steam and pressure, not filled with liquid.

In these two examples, all the ears of corn were cooked as if they were done individually, and the chicken drumsticks were falling-off the bone!

As an aside, I finished them off the drumsticks by browning them on my patio gas grill, and basting them with BBQ sauce when they were cooked. The inside is juicy and the outside, properly “grilled!”

To Timer or Not to Timer?

As you become more familiar with your Instant Pot® and recipes using this amazing tool, you’ll find that recipes are almost always ready. An example of this, extracted from one of the more popular recipes, reads, in part:

” Close and close the lid. Set the vent to “sealing.”

Select “Pressure Cook,” High, 20 minutes, “Warm” off.

When the display shows “Off”, follow the NPR and wait 10 minutes.

Follow the QR path to release all the remaining parts and rooms.

Wait until the pressure gauge pin drops.

Carefully open and remove the lid.”

The sky left the road, short for “NPR”, do you have to wait 10 minutes before starting.

Now you have a choice.

How do you know when 10 minutes wake up?

The obvious answer is, “You set a timer, and let the timer run out. When the timer expires, your wait is over.”

However, there are subtle changes you can make to the instructions and let the Instant Pot® tell you when that time is up.

Consider the following process:

” Close and close the lid. Set the vent to “sealing.”

Select “Pressure Cook,” High, 20 minutes, “Warm” on.

Wait until the display shows “L0010.”

Then do the QR code to release the remaining space and room.

Wait until the pressure gauge pin drops.

Carefully open and remove the lid.”

A little different. But one that “Warm” function works according to your schedule.

“But,” you may ask, “doesn’t that mean that while waiting, the content is still hot?”

Yes, and no. While it’s true the pressure cooker is technically “on”, the temperature of the controller is only 145°F ~ 172°F. That’s well below the ingredients that are being cooked at, and so therefore, further cooking at low temperatures will be unlikely.

The only down side, compared to other countdown timers, is that you have to watch the display while waiting.

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