How Do I Reference A City Website In Apa Style On the Meaning of Damcar in Rosicrucian Mysticism

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On the Meaning of Damcar in Rosicrucian Mysticism

In the Rosicrucian manifesto, Fama Fraternitatis, the young Christian Rosenkreutz received his knowledge of mysticism while traveling to the Holy Land, in a place called “Damcar,” described as a city in Arabia . While today the word “Arabia” tends to refer to the Arabian Peninsula, Fama is probably using it only to refer to the land inhabited by the Arabs. Throughout the forty years, scholars have tried to identify the city of Damcar, but without success.

The reason for using Damcar, not the real name of the mystical city, is that the real name will openly identify someone who created the Rosicrucian brotherhood, surely something that they want to keep secret. In 1652, the first English translator of Fama, Thomas Vaughan (who is mentioned below), was completely confused by the meaning of Damcar, but saw the truth about Damascus and thought that Damcar would is the same place, choose to define everything with the nonsensical “Damasco.” The first German words are in the sentence:

“Father CR.. to Damasco [Damascum], wanted to go from there to Jerusalem; But by reason of his infirmity he remained there, and by his skill in Physick he gained good favor with the Turks: At that time he became acquainted with the Wise Men of Damascus. [Damcar] in Arabia, and have seen the good thoughts they have made, and how nature has discovered them.”

Here we learn that Damcar is a city of wise men who have done incredible work. Since Brother CR was acquainted with them in Damascus, Syria, we must assume that the city of Damcar is still close to the city of Damascus.

The Fama continued: “Here is the high and greedy Spirit of Brother CR [C.R.C] so it was stirred, that Jerusalem is not so now in his heart as Damascus [Damcar]; He could not hinder his desire any longer, but made a negotiation with the Arabs, that they should bring him for some money to Damasco. [Damcar]; he was but sixteen years old when he came here, still a strong Dutchman [teutschen] Constitution.”

First of all, we see that Brother CR and Brother CRC cannot be the same person because Brother CR suffers from “physical weakness” but Brother CRC is only 16 years old and has legal rights bridge. Therefore, while Brother CR is in Damascus, Brother CRC must be in Jerusalem. Since Brother CRC paid the Arabs to take him to Damcar, we must assume that Damcar is still close to Jerusalem.

The city of Damcar is therefore close to Damascus and it is also close to Jerusalem. Where is he? Obviously, the city of Damcar must be in northern Israel.

We must now focus on the word “Dutch” towards the end of the last word. Since “Damcar” is an enigma, could it be an example of a Dutch word? LET’S TRY DRAKEN, again like Denkar, said Damcar. Dragon. Yes, dragon. But a better translation of “teutschen” would be “German” rather than “Dutch.” The German word for dragon is “Drachen,” which is close enough because the Germanic “c”, “ch” and “k” have similar sounds, and all the same arguments are used.

For the Christian thinker of the early 17th century, the words “yellow” and “Arabia” will soon become one: Saint George. Everyone knows that Saint George killed the dragon, from some legends near the Bay of Beirut, and from other legends in the Holy Land or in Libya, but nevertheless all somewhere in Arabic.

Next, we must remember the dignity “Spirit” of the CRC Brothers, which reminds us of the two “Sancti Spiritus” and “Spiritum Sanctum” from elsewhere in the Fama. So, Fama probably wants us to look only at “Saint” as a mystery (and ignore “George” only works in English because this is the saint of England!). “Saint” is a five-letter word that begins with the letter “S.”

For example: Damcar is a mystical city renowned for its wise people. It is located in northern Israel, and the real name of this city has five letters and starts with the letter “S.”

Safed, a city of northern Isreal, is the historical city of modern mysticism, known as Kabbalah. In the 15th and 16th centuries, intellectuals came from many places – from as far as Spain – to participate in it. There is no doubt that the mentioned city is Safed because Fama mentions Kabbalah (Cabala) or cabalists in four different places.

Isaac Luria, the famous founder of Lurianic Kabbalah, was 36 years old (16 plus 20 or “XX” part of “CXX” in Fama) when he arrived in Safed in 1570 after receiving a cold in Jerusalem (“Jerusalem is not much now in his mind”). In sharp contrast, in Safed he was welcomed with open arms (“there the wise received him not as a stranger (as he himself testified) but as one they have long desired”).

The story of Isaac Luria continues in Nova Atlantis, Rosicrucian “fragments” attributed to Sir Francis Bacon, where we meet the unknown “sacerdote Aegyptio.” These are the Spanish words inexplicably placed in all the Latin letters. The difference can be important: while the Latin “sacerdos” usually refers to a priest, the Spanish “sacerdote” can refer to a person who performs the rituals of a religion. After that, Nova Atlantis announced “Erat autem Iudaeus.” In fact, Isaac Luria was an Egyptian rabbi.

Nova Atlantis adds that it is sometimes called the Milky Way (“Vocabat eum etiam quandoque viam lacteam”). Luria was widely known as ha-Ari, the lion, where Leo is one of the stars of the Milky Way. And sometimes he is called Elijah of the Messiah (“quandoque Eliam Messiae”); Luria is noted for his frequent conversations with Elijah the prophet. And there are many other names that indicate his greatness (“aliis compluribus nominibus magnum eum insigniebat”): Ha’ARI Hakadosh, ARIZal, Rabbi Isaac ben Solomon Luria Ashkenazi. Most importantly, these words are quickly drawn from the direct reference to Kabbalah (“a secretam quandam cabalam”).

In conclusion, there are many reasons to think that Rosicrucian mysticism is historically derivative of Lurianic Kabbalah. Indeed, there seem to be many parallels in the teachings and beliefs of both.

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